New Interview | AMIT SHIMONI

Victoria Adelaide: How did you come up with Hipstory?
Amit Shimoni: 
The project is called Hipstory, which is a combination of the words “hipster” and “history.” The main idea is to talk about the paradox of hipsters. Hipsters embody that dream we all have to be unique, special, the most creative, and to stand out of the crowd. The paradox is that when someone does something unique, everybody else looks up to them ends up doing the same thing. I pick iconic leading figures of our time and from the past—from the political world or pop culture. The common point is that they all live or lived for their ideology, and I make them look like a fashion victim or just like us. My purpose is to use those characters as a mirror of ourselves. It is somehow a satirical observation of me and my generation.

 

VA: I heard that your characters have become so popular that teachers use them in history class with their students?
AS:
That’s right. Teachers all over the world teach history using my characters, as students can relate more easily to a Martin Luther King who may look like the people they admire than if they are shown an old picture of him in black and white. Somehow, it communicates and helps transmit the knowledge in a fun new way, and suddenly students are like, “Oh cool, where is this guy?”…

 

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Crush Of The Week | K. FLAY

Victoria Adelaide: Your new single, Not in California, addresses climate change, pollution, and other current issues. Can you tell us about the story that inspired the song?
K. Flay: I was working for a week out of the studio in Stinson Beach, which is part of what I would call, quintessentially California beautiful. It’s sandwiched right between the Pacific Ocean and the redwood forest and, in that environment, my headspace was naturally going towards this physical world that we live in. I think that there is a prevailing feeling among a lot of people in my generation and younger that we’re living in this world that we didn’t create, which is rapidly changing in a lot of frightening ways. I moved to California when I was 18. I fell in love with the state and the ethos of it, culturally and environmentally. There are many things about California that are typically American in certain ways. It represents a lot of the ideals of openness and freedom that are really important to me and were as an 18-year-old…

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Photo: Lan Tran